about us

let’s meet our

co-founders

The Practical Mindfulness program was developed jointly by clinical psychologist and Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) specialist Dr Colinda Linde, and high-performance life and executive coach Neil Bierbaum.

practical mindfulness co-founder neil bierbaum

Neil Bierbaum

NEIL has been a life and executive coach since 2005 and has practised and taught meditation for more than 20 years. The author of six books on mindfulness and personal effectiveness, he has worked with large corporates, SMEs, entrepreneurs and private clients—many of them looking to manage the enormous stress and increasing complexity in their work and personal lives and make sure they achieve their potential in an uncertain world.

practical mindfulness co-founder dr colinda linde

Dr Colinda Linde

COLINDA has been a clinical psychologist since 1993 and is the former chairperson of SADAG. She specialises in CBT for anxiety disorders (panic, social phobia), and works extensively in the areas of stress management, work-life balance, sleep issues, assertion and mindfulness. Colinda also practises and teaches meditation and founded the self-help CBT website thoughtsfirst.com.

let’s meet our

co-founders

The Practical Mindfulness program was developed jointly by clinical psychologist and Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) specialist Dr Colinda Linde, and high-performance life and executive coach Neil Bierbaum.

practical mindfulness co-founder neil bierbaum

Neil Bierbaum

NEIL has been a life and executive coach since 2005 and has practised and taught meditation for more than 20 years. The author of six books on mindfulness and personal effectiveness, he has worked with large corporates, SMEs, entrepreneurs and private clients—many of them looking to manage the enormous stress and increasing complexity in their work and personal lives and make sure they achieve their potential in an uncertain world.

practical mindfulness co-founder dr colinda linde

Dr Colinda Linde

COLINDA has been a clinical psychologist since 1993 and is the former chairperson of SADAG. She specialises in CBT for anxiety disorders (panic, social phobia), and works extensively in the areas of stress management, work-life balance, sleep issues, assertion and mindfulness. Colinda also practises and teaches meditation and founded the self-help CBT website thoughtsfirst.com.

let’s meet our

co-founders

The Practical Mindfulness program was developed jointly by clinical psychologist and Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) specialist Dr Colinda Linde, and high-performance life and executive coach Neil Bierbaum.

practical mindfulness co-founder neil bierbaum

Neil Bierbaum

NEIL has been a life and executive coach since 2005 and has practised and taught meditation for more than 20 years. The author of six books on mindfulness and personal effectiveness, he has worked with large corporates, SMEs, entrepreneurs and private clients—many of them looking to manage the enormous stress and increasing complexity in their work and personal lives and make sure they achieve their potential in an uncertain world.

practical mindfulness co-founder dr colinda linde

Dr Colinda Linde

COLINDA has been a clinical psychologist since 1993 and is the former chairperson of SADAG. She specialises in CBT for anxiety disorders (panic, social phobia), and works extensively in the areas of stress management, work-life balance, sleep issues, assertion and mindfulness. Colinda also practises and teaches meditation and founded the self-help CBT website thoughtsfirst.com.

mission statement (our “why”)

“We believe that everybody can learn to manage themselves to have a different, better experience of life.”

— Neil & Colinda

mission statement (our “why”)

“We believe that everybody can learn to manage themselves to have a different, better experience of life.”

— Neil & Colinda

mission statement (our “why”)

“We believe that everybody can learn to manage themselves to have a different, better experience of life.”

— Neil & Colinda

learn about the

three key elements

In an effort to simplify mindfulness into a set of simple, recognisable and memorable steps that could be easily applied to multiple real-life scenarios, we have identified three key elements that can be easily understood, remembered and replicated. They provide the guiding framework for this program. These key elements are described below and explained further in the videos that follow.

Being Aware

At a practical level, awareness means paying deliberate attention, not only to your external environment, but also to your inner world of thoughts, feelings and reactions. However, as the practice of mindfulness reveals, the mind has a mind of its own, and so this is a challenge. Therefore, awareness is a step in itself — perhaps the most important step.

Being Nonjudgmental

Being nonjudgemental means giving up your attachment to your preferences — your likes and dislikes — and your strongly held judgements of things as good or bad, and instead seeing things “as they are”. This makes no sense to the Western mind, which places a high value on self-assertion and opinions. That’s precisely what makes this key element so challenging — and valuable.

Being Nonreactive

To react is automatic, which implies no choice: you don’t choose to get angry, or jealous, for example; you just find yourself there. In fact, afterwards, you may regret it. Being nonreactive, on the other hand, shows up as a deliberate thought or action based on a consciously chosen response. This arises spontaneously from being aware and being nonjudgemental — the first two key elements.

Introduction to the 3 Key Elements

In this short video, program co-founder Dr Colinda Linde introduces the 3 Key Elements of Practical Mindfulness.

Introduction to Being Nonjudgemental

In this short video, program co-founder Neil Bierbaum talks about the second key element, which is Being Nonjudgemental.

learn about the

three key elements

In an effort to simplify mindfulness into a set of simple, recognisable and memorable steps that could be easily applied to multiple real-life scenarios, we have identified three key elements that can be easily understood, remembered and replicated. They provide the guiding framework for this program. These key elements are described below and explained further in the videos that follow.

Being Aware

At a practical level, awareness means paying deliberate attention, not only to your external environment, but also to your inner world of thoughts, feelings and reactions. However, as the practice of mindfulness reveals, the mind has a mind of its own, and so this is a challenge. Therefore, awareness is a step in itself — perhaps the most important step.

Being Nonjudgmental

Being nonjudgemental means giving up your attachment to your preferences — your likes and dislikes — and your strongly held judgements of things as good or bad, and instead seeing things “as they are”. This makes no sense to the Western mind, which places a high value on self-assertion and opinions. That’s precisely what makes this key element so challenging — and valuable.

Being Nonreactive

To react is automatic, which implies no choice: you don’t choose to get angry, or jealous, for example; you just find yourself there. In fact, afterwards, you may regret it. Being nonreactive, on the other hand, shows up as a deliberate thought or action based on a consciously chosen response. This arises spontaneously from being aware and being nonjudgemental — the first two key elements.

Introduction to the 3 Key Elements

In this short video, program co-founder Dr Colinda Linde introduces the 3 Key Elements of Practical Mindfulness.

Introduction to Being Nonjudgemental

In this short video, program co-founder Neil Bierbaum talks about the second key element, which is Being Nonjudgemental.

learn about the

three key elements

In an effort to simplify mindfulness into a set of simple, recognisable and memorable steps that could be easily applied to multiple real-life scenarios, we have identified three key elements that can be easily understood, remembered and replicated. They provide the guiding framework for this program. These key elements are described below and explained further in the videos that follow.

Being Aware

At a practical level, awareness means paying deliberate attention, not only to your external environment, but also to your inner world of thoughts, feelings and reactions. However, as the practice of mindfulness reveals, the mind has a mind of its own, and so this is a challenge. Therefore, awareness is a step in itself — perhaps the most important step.

Being Nonjudgmental

Being nonjudgemental means giving up your attachment to your preferences — your likes and dislikes — and your strongly held judgements of things as good or bad, and instead seeing things “as they are”. This makes no sense to the Western mind, which places a high value on self-assertion and opinions. That’s precisely what makes this key element so challenging — and valuable.

Being Nonreactive

To react is automatic, which implies no choice: you don’t choose to get angry, or jealous, for example; you just find yourself there. In fact, afterwards, you may regret it. Being nonreactive, on the other hand, shows up as a deliberate thought or action based on a consciously chosen response. This arises spontaneously from being aware and being nonjudgemental — the first two key elements.

Introduction to the 3 Key Elements

In this short video, program co-founder Dr Colinda Linde introduces the 3 Key Elements of Practical Mindfulness.

Introduction to Being Nonjudgemental

In this short video, program co-founder Neil Bierbaum talks about the second key element, which is Being Nonjudgemental.

why not book a

class or workshop

why not book a

class or workshop

why not book a

class or workshop